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zondag 29 mei 2011

time



                                            
                                          
  (just click "time" or "10 x10" to open a new window)
10x10™ ('ten by ten') is an interactive exploration of the words and pictures that define the time. The result is an often moving, sometimes shocking, occasionally frivolous, but always fitting snapshot of our world. Every hour, 10x10 collects the 100 words and pictures that matter most on a global scale, and presents them as a single image, taken to encapsulate that moment in time. Over the course of days, months, and years, 10x10 leaves a trail of these hourly statements which, stitched together side by side, form a continuous patchwork tapestry of human life.
10x10 is ever-changing, ever-growing, quietly observing the ways in which we live. It records our wars and crises, our triumphs and tragedies, our mistakes and milestones. When we make history, or at least the headlines, 10x10 takes note and remembers.
Each hour is presented as a picture postcard window, composed of 100 different frames, each of which holds the image of a single moment in time. Clicking on a single frame allows us to peer a bit deeper into the story that lies behind the image. In this way, we can dart in and out of the news, understanding both the individual stories and the ways in which they relate to each other.
10x10 runs with no human intervention, autonomously observing what a handful of leading international news sources are saying and showing. 10x10 makes no comment on news media bias, or lack thereof. It has no politics, nor any secret agenda; it simply shows what it finds.
With no human editors and no regulation, 10x10 is open and free, raw and fresh, and consequently a unique way of following world events. In 10x10, we respond instinctively to patterns in the grid, visual indicators of relevance. When we see a frequently repeated image, we know it’s important. When we see a picture of a movie star next to a picture of dead bodies, we understand the extremes that exist in our world. Scanning a grid of pictures can be more intuitive than reading headlines, for it lets the news come to life, and everything feels a bit less distant, a bit closer to heart, and maybe, if we're lucky, gives us pause to think. If you'd like to learn more about 10x10, you can read how it works.
Credits.
10x10 was designed and developed by Jonathan Harris of Number27, in conjunction with the FABRICA communication research center in Italy.
Contact.
You can contact Jonathan Harris by mailing: jjh "AT" number27 "DOT" org

3 opmerkingen:

Sharon zei

Brave new world. I'm not sure I like the idea that no humans are involved - but then it will create a startling way of seeing ourselves. Unedited by anything human...commenting on all of us with a weird perspective. One, none of us has seen on a scale like this before. Fascinating in a strange way.

cerulean zei

You've got a point. But I think, in some sense, it was edited by human intervention by the choice for news headlines and news sources.In that way it's a subjective snapshot of the world(news)and indeed fascinating in a strange way.

Sharon zei

Yes, point taken. I do agree with you, and when it uses 'a handful of leading international new sources' it is 'edited', first tier, by humans. It's fascinating. Having just reread this, and realizing that it is 'words' & pictures, I am very eager to have a look. The tapestry of languages and alphabets must be a wonder in itself. And very beautiful. I'm hoping that the handful of leading international new sources goes very deep indeed.

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